TO WALK OR NOT TO WALK – THAT IS THE QUESTION

If an umpire or referee made a mistake in sport how many people would stop the game and say “excuse me ref I was actually at fault but you missed it”. 

I might be wrong but I’ve never seen it once in over 20 years of playing sport and three years of being a referee.

English cricketer, Stuart Broad, has been widely criticised, in Australian circles, for not walking after being given not out for a catch behind.

Replays show he hit it and he knew he hit it, yet he didn’t ‘walk on’ like he was a Johnnie Walker ambassador. 

Should he have shown ‘sportsmanship’ and walked? 

In rugby league or rugby, from grass roots to the top level has anyone ever seen a player knock on, which was missed by the referee and the offending player turn to the ref and say “actually, I knocked on. Pack a scrum and give the ball to the opposition”. 

Has anyone seen a tennis player serve an ace and then turn to the linesman and say “I think I foot faulted, take the ace off me”. 

It just doesn’t happen – like a night club bouncer changing his mind and letting someone into a bar or a parking cop overturning a ticket infringement. 

Adam Gilchrist did walk and others have too. Michael Clarke hasn’t walked in the past. 

Broad played by the rules. 

Will Australian’s walk for the rest of the Ashes? Only time will tell. 

Picture this scenario. It’s the deciding test match. Australia are nine for, needing one more run to win the series and The Ashes. There is a snick to the keeper. The umpire says “not out”. 

Do you think the Australian batsman would walk? 

Would you want him to walk? 

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2 thoughts on “TO WALK OR NOT TO WALK – THAT IS THE QUESTION

  1. I wrote a piece on this here:
    http://rollo75.blogspot.com.au/2013/07/horse-1511-should-batsman-walk.html

    Basically, a player as part of a team has his first responsibility to the team. If an umpire has given him not out, then his responsibility to the team dictates that he should play on.

    Curiously, the incident with Gilchrist walking in the 2003 World Cup semi final wasn’t actually more to do with speaking against racism which he experienced rather than being sporting or not.

    • Nice piece. With sportsmanship unfortunately dead, the responsibility is absolutely to the team.

      I still find it very sad that there is a lack of sportsmanship in sport.

      I play a high level of touch football and have never and will never call phantoms and I know none of teammates will either.

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